Ohio Valley Environmental Coalition
Archive list of "E"- Notes newsletters

Click below to read articles online, or try the PDF version to view or print a replica of the paper newsletter.  Online version includes extra articles.

Winds of Change
December 2003

Contents

OVEC's Win in Clean Water Act Case Has Nationwide and MTR Permit Implications

Ode to Massey Coal - How to Do Energy All Wrong

Granny D, Doris Haddock: On the Road Again!

Massey Coal Ordered to Monitor for Mercury, Other Toxics

On the Road to Change

Florence and Goliath, or, Standing Up for What's Right

Flat Land, or Flat Out Lie?

Mountaintop Removal Coal Mining Arouses Passionate Comments During Comment Period

Your EIS Comments - Big Brother at OSM Is Watching Us!

Corps Idea of "Minimal Impact" Challenged in Court

Jack Spadaro's Story:
Work for MSHA, Tell
the Truth, Get Fired

WV Supreme Court Agrees to Hear OVEC Member's Case Against Arch Coal

Mountaintop Removal Mining Photos

Another Massive Massey Sludge Impoundment Proposed

Global Warming Topic of Annual Conference on the Environment

Guess What? Those Rules SAVE $$$

Even AEP knows global warming is real!

Sludge Impoundments in Spotlight - Again

Meet the New Boss at the EPA - the Same As the Old Boss at the EPA ... Sigh ...

On Getting Along

Just Say NO to Mountaintop Removal / Valley Fills in Papua, New Guinea

They Get It in California...

Remembering Laura - Memorial Fund Helps Her Passion Live On

Gifts That Give Twice - Just in Time for the Holidays!

OVEC - in ACTION

Miscellany

Web Extra Articles Below
(not in printed newsletter)

Six Million and One Reasons Why West Virginia Needs Clean Elections

Coal-bed methane attracts Halliburton to West Virginia

Public deserves a real
solution to slurry spills


For viewing the PDF version

 

Mountaintop Removal Mining Photos

Mountaintop removal-valley fill strip mining has to be seen to be believed, but it is seldom seen because most of the sites are miles from public roads, tucked at the end of (formerly) quiet hollows whose access roads are coal-company controlled.

About the only way you can really see and appreciate the awful, complete and total destruction of this practice is to view it from the air, which is what OVEC's Vivian Stockman had an opportunity to do in October 2003. The pictures do not really need captions - the images speak for themselves with silent eloquence.

You may want to skip the next these photos unless you have a really strong stomach. It's not pretty. You have been warned. 


The homes in this and the next photo are just down the road from Leon and Lucille Millers. Unable to bear the house-shaking noise and dust from MTR-related blasting and the psychological toll from the destruction of their beloved forests and streams, the husband and wife (related to the Millers) who own this Lincoln County, WV, home (above) have very reluctantly sold their property to Arch Coal, operator of the Hobet 21 mountaintop removal coal mine. The husband used to teach school for a small community up a miles-long valley that was nearby. The people were driven out of their community by the mine. That valley is now buried under hundreds of millions of tons of former mountaintop.   Click here to view hi resolution photoPhoto by Vivian Stockman, Oct. 19, 2003


Click here to view hi resolution photoPhoto by Vivian Stockman, Oct. 19, 2003


Even this massive dragline (center) is dwarfed by the enormous scale of mountaintop removal mining.  Click here to view hi resolution photoPhoto by Vivian Stockman, Oct. 19, 2003


Marfork Coal Co.'s (Massey Energy) massive Brushy Fork impoundment near Whitesville, WV, is designed to hold 8 BILLION gallons of sludge.  Click here to view hi resolution photoPhoto by Vivian Stockman, Oct. 19, 2003


Mountaintop removal/valley fill mining operations in southern West Virginia have already flattened more than 300,800 acres of what used to be one of the most productive and biologically-diverse temperate hardwood forests on Earth. The coal industry prefers to call it "mountaintop mining" to try and soften the brutal reality. Some conservation groups have taken to calling the practice "mountain range removal" because that in effect is what it really is - more than 460 square miles of West Virginia are now low rolling semi-grassy mounds, planted largely with non-native species and incapable of supporting much more life than a shopping mall parking lot (without the shoppers).  Photo by Vivian Stockman, Oct. 19, 2003


See above caption.  Photo by Vivian Stockman, Oct. 19, 2003

See OVEC's Mountaintop Removal Mining Galleries for more pictures

 

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