Ohio Valley Environmental Coalition

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COAL TRUCK FACTS THE INDUSTRY IS TRYING TO IGNORE

KENTUCKY FACTS

Kentucky increased the maximum limits for coal trucks from 80,000 pounds to 126,000 pounds in 1986. Studies show that 88% of coal trucks traveling US 23 are still overweight and Kentucky is still laying off miners!

Kentucky spent $75 million to repair US 23 during the time span of 1996 through 2001, a cost of $15 million a year. Reputable engineers estimate that normal repairs would cost $25 million. Who pays? Taxpayers!

WEST VIRGINIA FACTS

According to the West Virginia Department of Highways, it would take $2.8 billion to upgrade the 2,684 miles of roads that coal trucks travel on. The industry bill SB 583 proposes a $500 per truck special permit. At $500 per truck the state would need to sell 5.6 million special permits to raise $2.8 billion.

An 80,000 pound coal truck does as much damage to roads as 9,600 cars. A 120,000 pound coal truck would increase the amount of damage equal to 37,440 cars. Who pays for the extra damage? TAXPAYERS!!

TRUCK FACTS

There is a sharp increase in the truck crash fatality rate with each ton carried.

Brakes adapted for heavier trucks are more likely to lock up when a truck returns empty.

A 100,000 pound truck with unadjusted brakes travels 25% further after the driver steps on the brakes than an 80,000 vehicle will. A 120,000 pound truck travels 50% further.

Heavier trucks have higher centers of gravity and are more likely to rollover.

Higher truck weights increase truck brake temperatures during downhill travel, making them more likely to fail.

The steering sensitivity of trucks falls sharply as the vehicle weight increases.

SB 583 means HIGHER TAXES , HIGHER INSURANCE RATES, NO ADDED JOB SECURITY, AND MORE DEATHS!

 

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